£ 0 to £ 3,000

Your search results

Guidelines for Landlords

house-interior-design-6

We hope that you find these guidelines helpful, so that the tenancy runs smoothly and complies with the law. If you require further advice or assistance with any matter, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Mortgage

If your property is mortgaged, you should obtain your mortgagee’s written consent to the letting. They may require additional clauses in the tenancy agreement of which you must inform us.

Leaseholds

Leaseholders should check the terms of their lease, and obtain any necessary written consent before letting.

Insurance

You should ensure that you are suitably covered for letting under both your buildings and contents insurance. Failure to inform your insurers may invalidate your policies.

Utility Bills

We will arrange for the transfer of Council Tax and utility accounts to the Tenant.

British Telecom will require instructions directly from both the Landlord and the Tenant.

Income tax

When resident in the UK, it is entirely the Landlords responsibility to inform the Revenue & Customs of rental income received, and to pay any tax due. Where the Landlord is resident outside the UK during a tenancy, he/she will require an exemption certificate from the Revenue & Customs before he can receive rental balances without deduction of tax.

The inventory

Inventory reports are regarded as the second most important document related to renting. They are extremely important for successfully claiming back your deposit when you leave the property.

We can arrange for a member of staff to prepare an inventory of the property.

What is an AST?

The most common form of tenancy is an AST. Most new tenancies are automatically this type.

A tenancy can be an AST if all of the following apply:

  • you’re a private landlord or housing association
  • the tenancy started on or after 15 January 1989
  • the property is your tenants’ main accommodation
  • you don’t live in the property

A tenancy can’t be an AST if:

  • it began or was agreed before 15 January 1989
  • the rent is more than £100,000 a year
  • the rent is less than £250 a year (less than £1,000 in London)
  • it’s a business tenancy or tenancy of licensed premises
  • it’s a holiday let
  • the landlord is a local council

Share

Compare